Transcript

[Sirens]

[Music playing throughout video]

Text on screen: San Diego County, California

CHIEF KEN KREMENSKY, BARONA FIRE DEPARTMENT (CA)

The Indian country a lot of our reservations are in areas that are kind of a little remote and it's hard to get that information sometimes in the county the wild land agencies as well as mutual aid partners coming in on the big fires which we have quite a fire history in this county. We use mobile data computers which provides our information, dispatch information we get, it comes up on the screen. We use that also for our wild interface plans so that agencies come in—that’s really important so that when they come in they can pull that information up, so we can look up real-time weather, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, we know which way the winds coming to Santa Ana or it's just a regular west wind day. We can use it for looking at where structures are, where there’s hazards, good road conditions, not-so-good road conditions, where our water supplies are so that if we have agencies coming from the outside, they can pull that information up. And it—it helps us to work together as a team.

[Helicopter noise]

PERSON 1

Text on screen: We have a thing called Downlink. Basically what happens is it runs through the camera onboard and transmits to our fire communications center

CHIEF KEN KREMENSKY, BARONA FIRE DEPARTMENT (CA)

Another one that’s huge, I think, for the fire service, is that thermal imaging cameras that we have now. Being able to see infrared, going into a burning building, we can—it looks through smoke and tells us where if there's a body in there to find them. Shows us where hidden fires, where it’s going to help with safety, with the firefighter safety. Being able to use some of that data and technology that keep the firefighters safer in environments that are very hazardous. Being able to access that data is important and it helps us to work together as a team and be more efficient in doing our job.

[Sirens]

[Sirens]

[Music playing throughout video]

Text on screen: San Diego County, California

CHIEF KEN KREMENSKY, BARONA FIRE DEPARTMENT (CA)

The Indian country a lot of our reservations are in areas that are kind of a little remote and it's hard to get that information sometimes in the county the wild land agencies as well as mutual aid partners coming in on the big fires which we have quite a fire history in this county. We use mobile data computers which provides our information, dispatch information we get, it comes up on the screen. We use that also for our wild interface plans so that agencies come in—that’s really important so that when they come in they can pull that information up, so we can look up real-time weather, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, we know which way the winds coming to Santa Ana or it's just a regular west wind day. We can use it for looking at where structures are, where there’s hazards, good road conditions, not-so-good road conditions, where our water supplies are so that if we have agencies coming from the outside, they can pull that information up. And it—it helps us to work together as a team.

[Helicopter noise]

PERSON 1

Text on screen: We have a thing called Downlink. Basically what happens is it runs through the camera onboard and transmits to our fire communications center

CHIEF KEN KREMENSKY, BARONA FIRE DEPARTMENT (CA)

Another one that’s huge, I think, for the fire service, is that thermal imaging cameras that we have now. Being able to see infrared, going into a burning building, we can—it looks through smoke and tells us where if there's a body in there to find them. Shows us where hidden fires, where it’s going to help with safety, with the firefighter safety. Being able to use some of that data and technology that keep the firefighters safer in environments that are very hazardous. Being able to access that data is important and it helps us to work together as a team and be more efficient in doing our job.

[Sirens]