Transcript

[Music playing throughout video]

Text on screen: Adrian Calimquim, Paiute Police Officer

Text on screen: James Dew, Paiute Police Officer

Text on screen: Megahertz on the Rez: Las Vegas Paiute Tribal Police Department

ADRIAN CALIMQUIM, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

From time to time the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe Police Department would get called upon by another outside agency who’s asking for assistance. We had reports that the person was actually walking out in the middle of the desert and who was lost and probably had a psychological or mental problem.

JAMES DEW, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

When we respond to a call of a missing person or suspicious person out here, a lot people are not all there and we're here to help; we're not here to take them to jail.

ADRIAN CALIMQUIM, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

Smartphones are—is a great tool while policing. One of the things that we use the apps for is—look at the area, look at the streets, and a better picture of, you know, if the road ends at a certain distance or if there is a road over there.

PERSON 1

Excuse me sir.

ADRIAN CALIMQUIM, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

We found a person, and asked if the person was ok, though he did look pretty stressed out and depressed, and as soon as we figured out what was wrong with the person, he was transported to a nearby hospital.

JAMES DEW, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

Everywhere you go there's cameras. Like lots of times we’re by ourselves; community people will have their cell phones. Every incident that we go on, we turn our body cameras on. By having body cameras, it tells our point of view the way it really happened.

ADRIAN CALIMQUIM, PAIUTE POLICE OFFICER

The increase in technology makes me feel a lot more safer, because we're able to show the public what actually happens from beginning of an incident to the end of it. But at the end of the night, when you go to sleep, you know you feel good knowing the fact that you made a difference in the in the community that you police.